South Korea ready to support Thailand with natural disaster technology

Published on March 25, 2012 by TFP   ·   No Comments

BANGKOK, 25 March 2012 – South Korea has expressed its enthusiasm to provide Thailand with the appropriate technology and up-to-date data aimed at reducing future losses caused by natural disasters.



Following a wreath-laying ceremony at the Korean War Memorial to pay respect to the 130 Thai soldiers who lost their lives in the Korean War, Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, together with Cabinet members and representatives from the Strategic Committee for Water Resources Management (SCWRM), visited the Han River Flood Control Office and the Ipo Weir in Yeoju town in Gyeonggi province to compile information on South Korea’s water management strategies for use in the planning and development of Thailand’s own water management system.



The Korean Minister of Land, Transportation and Maritime Affairs explained that the Han River Flood Control Office oversees and manages the country’s entire water management system. The center’s main task lies in controlling flood crisis and droughts based on an exchange of technology between different organizations. He went on to elaborate that natural disasters such as the ones Thailand had faced, including storms, typhoons and heavy rains, have caused a great loss in both life and property.



Thus, he viewed that the issue of natural disasters is not a problem indigenous to one particular country or region; however, it is a pressing matter which needs to be collectively addressed by the entire global community. Therefore, South Korea and Thailand should engage themselves in an even stronger cooperation. The minister stated that South Korea is happy to provide up-to-date data and technology to Thailand in order to help prevent further losses from natural catastrophes.



Meanwhile, PM Yingluck has expressed great interest in South Korea’s water management system. The center’s officials have pointed out that specialists are stationed at the center 24 hours a day while water analysts closely monitor and analyze the situation from information based on radar, satellite and other databases. The center’s natural disaster warning system is capable of giving a day-to-day alert, a 6-7 hour alert and a three-day alert.



South Korea currently has four Flood Control Centers across the country. The centers are managed by a state enterprise called K Water. With a real time system, the centers allow the government time to converge on data and make a decision before alerting the people of the looming natural disaster.




(NNT : suwit)

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